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Her Majesty The Queen Verified Account

The Queen has ruled for longer than any other Monarch in British history, becoming a much loved and respected figure across the globe. Her extraordinary reign has seen her travel more widely than any other monarch, undertaking many historic overseas visits. Known for her sense of duty and her devotion to a life of service, she has been an important figurehead for the UK and the Commonwealth during times of enormous social change.

Her Majesty continues to carry out a full programme of engagements, from visits to charities and schools, to hosting visiting Heads of State, to leading the nation in Remembrance and celebratory events - all supported by other members of the Royal Family. 

The Queen sees public and voluntary service as one of the most important elements of her work. The Queen has links - as Royal Patron or President - with over 600 charities, military associations, professional bodies and public service organisations. These vary from well-established international charities to smaller bodies working in a specialist area or on a local basis only.

Her patronages and charities cover a wide range of issues, from opportunities for young people, to the preservation of wildlife and the environment. Having Her Majesty as Royal patron or president provides vital publicity for the work of these organisations, and allows their enormous achievements and contributions to society to be recognised.

Her Majesty supports and encourages achievement in all walks of life through the annual programme of Investitures (at which she presents members of the general public with their honours), Garden Parties, receptions and other awards given in her name, which allow her to say ‘thank you’ to all those who have contributed to the life of the nation and the Commonwealth.

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The Duke of Edinburgh Verified Account

Following a successful naval career during which he saw active service in the Second World War, The Duke of Edinburgh began to focus on his work in support of The Queen following her Accession in 1952. In 2009 he became the longest serving British consort (companion to the Sovereign), a distinction previously held by Queen Charlotte, George III’s consort. His Royal Highness also has many interests which he pursues separately to his work with Her Majesty, including conservation, engineering, and The Duke of Edinburgh's Award which he founded in 1956.

In May 2017 it was announced that  The Duke of Edinburgh had decided, with full support of The Queen, to no longer carry out public engagements. 

The Duke of Edinburgh is Patron, President or a member of over 780 organisations, with which he continues to be associated, although he no longer plays an active role by attending engagements.

The Duke of Edinburgh is Patron, President or otherwise connected with some 800 organisations. Though probably best known for founding The Duke of Edinburgh Award scheme in 1956, His Royal Highness is also involved in the work of many more charities and organisations which reflect his wide ranging interests in topics including conservation, sport, the military and engineering.

The Duke of Edinburgh is involved in a great many charities, with special interests in scientific and technological research, the conservation of the environment and the encouragement of sport.

His passion for industry has been seen in countless visits to research laboratories, coalmines, factories and engineering works, with the aim of contributing to the improvement of British industrial life. On an international scale, he has sponsored six conferences on the human problems of industrial communities within the Commonwealth, in his capacity as Patron of The Work Foundation.

Between 1959 and 2011 The Duke chaired the judging panel for The Prince Philip Designers Prize, which rewarded the innovation and creativity of designers and engineers shaping daily life. Winners included product designer Sir James Dyson, architect Lord Foster (designer of 30 St Mary Axe, or 'The Gherkin') and  Andrew Ritchie, inventor of the Brompton folding bicycle.

The Duke of Edinburgh Awards

First launched in 1956 in collaboration with German educationalist Kurt Hahn and Lord Hunt, leader of the first successful ascent of Everest, The Duke of Edinburgh's Award has become the world's leading youth achievement award. The Award operates in more than 140 countries and in its 60 years of running has inspired millions of young people to serve their communities, experience adventure and develop and learn outside of the classroom. The four key elements of the Award are Service, Skills, Physical Recreation and Adventurous Journey, and is open to those between 14 and 24 years of age.

In 2016 The Duke of Edinburgh's Award celebrated its 60th anniversary. To celebrate the occasion the DofE encouraged people of all ages to set and achieve their goals through the DofE Diamond Challenge. The Duke and other members of the Royal Family also marked the milestone at a series of events, from a garden party in the grounds of Buckingham Palace to visits around the UK to meet DofE participants and supporters.

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The Prince of Wales Verified Account

Click here to visit the official website of The Prince of Wales.

While there is no formal constitutional role for the Heir to the Throne, The Prince of Wales seeks, with the support of his wife, The Duchess of Cornwall, to do all he can to make a difference for the better in the UK and internationally.

The way His Royal Highness does so can be divided into three parts: undertaking official Royal duties in support of Her Majesty The Queen and on behalf of Her Majesty’s Government, working as a charitable entrepreneur, by supporting charitable and civil causes which promote positive social and environmental outcomes and promoting and protecting national traditions, virtues and excellence. 

Early life

The Prince of Wales, eldest son of The Queen and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh, was born at Buckingham Palace at 9.14pm on 14 November 1948. A month later, on 15 December, Charles Philip Arthur George was christened in the Music Room at Buckingham Palace, by the Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Geoffrey Fisher.

The Prince's mother was proclaimed Queen Elizabeth II at the age of 25, when her father, King George VI, died aged 56 on 6 February 1952. On The Queen's accession to the throne, Prince Charles - as the Sovereign's eldest son - became heir apparent at the age of three.

The Prince, as Heir to the Throne, took on the traditional titles of The Duke of Cornwall under a charter of King Edward III in 1337; and, in the Scottish peerage, of Duke of Rothesay, Earl of Carrick, Baron Renfrew, Lord of the Isles, and Prince and Great Steward of Scotland.

The Prince was four at his mother's Coronation, in Westminster Abbey on 2 June 1953. Many who watched the Coronation have vivid memories of him seated between his widowed grandmother, now to be known as Queen Elizabeth The Queen Mother, and his aunt, Princess Margaret.

Education

The Queen and The Duke of Edinburgh decided that The Prince should go to school rather than have a tutor at the Palace. The Prince started at Hill House school in West London on 7 November 1956.

In 2016 The Duke of Edinburgh's Award celebrated its 60th anniversary. To celebrate the occasion the DofE encouraged people of all ages to set and achieve their goals through the DofE Diamond Challenge. The Duke and other members of the Royal Family also marked the milestone at a series of events, from a garden party in the grounds of Buckingham Palace to visits around the UK to meet DofE participants and supporters.

After 10 months, the young Prince became a boarder at Cheam School, a preparatory school in Berkshire. In 1958, while The Prince was at Cheam, The Queen created him The Prince of Wales and Earl of Chester. The Prince was nine-years-old.

In April 1962 The Prince began his first term at Gordonstoun, a school near Elgin in Eastern Scotland which The Duke of Edinburgh had attended.

The Prince of Wales spent two terms in 1966 as an exchange student at Timbertop, a remote outpost of the Geelong Church of England Grammar School in Melbourne, Australia.

When he returned to Gordonstoun for his final year, The Prince of Wales was appointed school guardian (head boy). The Prince, who had already passed six O Levels, also took A Levels and was awarded a grade B in history and a C in French, together with a distinction in an optional special history paper in July 1967.

The Prince went to Cambridge University in 1967 to read archaeology and anthropology at Trinity College. He changed to history for the second part of his degree, and in 1970 was awarded a 2:2 degree.

Investiture and military career

His Royal Highness was invested as Prince of Wales by The Queen on 1 July 1969 in a colourful ceremony at Caernarfon Castle. Before the investiture The Prince had spent a term at the University College of Wales at Aberystwyth, learning to speak Welsh.

On 11 February 1970, His Royal Highness took his seat in the House of Lords.

On 8 March 1971 The Prince flew himself to Royal Air Force (RAF) Cranwell in Lincolnshire, to train as a jet pilot. At his own request, The Prince had received flying instruction from the RAF during his second year at Cambridge.

In September 1971 after the passing out parade at Cranwell, The Prince embarked on a naval career, following in the footsteps of his father, grandfather and both his great-grandfathers.

The six-week course at the Royal Naval College, Dartmouth, was followed by service on the guided missile destroyer HMS Norfolk and two frigates.

The Prince qualified as a helicopter pilot in 1974 before joining 845 Naval Air Squadron, which operated from the Commando carrier HMS Hermes. On 9 February 1976, The Prince took command of the coastal minehunter HMS Bronington for his last nine months in the Navy.

Click here to find out more about The Prince of Wales's military career.

Family and married life

On 29 July 1981, The Prince of Wales married Lady Diana Spencer in St Paul's Cathedral, who became HRH The Princess of Wales.

Lady Diana's father, then Viscount Althorp and later the eighth Earl Spencer, had been an equerry to both George VI and The Queen. Her maternal grandmother, Ruth, Lady Fermoy, was a close friend and Lady-in-Waiting to The Queen Mother.

The Prince and Princess of Wales had two sons: Prince William, born on 21 June 1982; and Prince Harry, born on 15 September 1984.

From the time of their marriage, The Prince and Princess of Wales went on overseas tours and carried out many engagements together in the UK.

On 9 December 1992, The Prime Minister, John Major, announced to the House of Commons that The Prince and Princess of Wales had agreed to separate. The marriage was dissolved on 28 August 1996. The Princess was still regarded as a member of the Royal Family. She continued to live at Kensington Palace and to carry out her public work for a number of charities.

When The Princess was killed in a car crash in Paris on 31 August 1997, The Prince of Wales flew to Paris with her two sisters to bring her body back to London. The Princess lay in the Chapel Royal at St James's Palace until the night before the funeral.

On the day of the funeral, The Prince of Wales accompanied his two sons, aged 15 and 12 at the time, as they walked behind the coffin from The Mall to Westminster Abbey. With them were The Duke of Edinburgh and The Princess's brother, Earl Spencer. 

The Prince of Wales asked the media to respect his sons' privacy, to allow them to lead a normal school life. In the following years, Princes William and Harry, who are now second and sixth in line to the throne, accompanied their father on a limited number of official engagements in the UK and abroad.

On 9 April 2005, The Prince of Wales and Mrs Parker Bowles were married in a civil ceremony at the Guildhall, Windsor. After the wedding, Mrs Parker Bowles became known as HRH The Duchess of Cornwall.

The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall were joined by around 800 guests at a Service of Prayer and Dedication at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle.

The Service was followed by a reception at Windsor Castle hosted by Her Majesty The Queen.

To find out more about The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall, visit their official website here.

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The Duchess of Cornwall Verified Account

Click here to visit the official website of The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall.

The Duchess of Cornwall supports her husband, The Prince of Wales, in carrying out his work and duties as Heir to the Throne. She also undertakes public engagements on behalf of the charities that she supports.

Since her marriage to The Prince of Wales in 2005, The Duchess of Cornwall has become Patron or President of a number of charities and regularly attends events to support them. To find out more about Her Royal Highness's charitable work, please visit The Duchess’s official website

Early life

The Duchess of Cornwall is the daughter of Major Bruce Middleton Hope Shand and The Hon Rosalind Maud Shand (nee Cubitt).

She was born Camilla Rosemary Shand on 17 July 1947 at King’s College Hospital, London, the eldest of three children. Her Royal Highness has a sister, Annabel Elliot; her brother, Mark Shand, died in 2014.

The Duchess was first educated at Dumbrells School, a co-ed school in Sussex, and then attended Queen’s Gate School in South Kensington.

She also attended Mon Fertile School in Switzerland and studied at the Institut Britannique in Paris.

Family and married life

The Prince of Wales and The Duchess of Cornwall married at the Guildhall in Windsor on 9 April 2005 in a civil ceremony. Afterwards, there was a Service of Prayer and Dedication in St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle, over which the Archbishop of Canterbury presided. Her Majesty The Queen then hosted a reception for The Prince and The Duchess at the Castle.

Her Royal Highness was formerly married to Brigadier Andrew Parker Bowles, and the marriage was dissolved in 1995. They had two children, Thomas Henry and Laura Rose. Her Royal Highness has five grandchildren.

Click here to find out more about The Prince of Wales's military career.

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